My Life is an Act of Devotion

My heart was a vessel brimming with love that burned my skin and broke my soul. All my life I waited for Someone to take this cup from within me and drink from it, so I that I would know release. You, My Lady, have taken the cup from me and emptied it to the last drop.

And then You filled it again.

Taking it public

Reblogging for an awesome project and an awesome person.

The Remote Controlled Hearth

I have concluded that the baby quilt project requires too much time, effort, and energy for one person. There’s a need beyond the hospitals around my front door, and I can’t do it alone. I’ve created a Facebook page for others to join in the project, whether it’s making quilts, knitting or crocheting preemie caps, sewing burial gowns for the babies who don’t make it, or just lending moral support to people who do. My hope is that we’ll be able to make something happen well beyond my own community, as I’m wanting volunteers to make items for their own local hospitals. The Brighid’s Babies Project page is live on Facebook now, and if you’re interested in taking part, I would love to hear from you!

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Medicine Buddha

The Medicine Buddha  is a popular figure in Mahayana Buddhism, especially in Tibet and Japan, as well as China. In Sanskrit, his name Bhaișajyaguru, and he features in a sutra entitled Bhaișajya Guru Vaidūrya Prabhā Rāja Sutra, which can be translated as “Medicine King Master and Lapis Lazuli Light.” The title alludes both to his function as a Buddha of healing, and to his trademark association (at least in Tibetan Buddhism) with the color deep blue.

Bhaișajyaguru is said to be a guardian of the Eastern direction, and may actually supplant The Buddha Akshobhya, who is far more commonly said to fill this role. Just like the far more famous Amitabha, he also rules over his own Pure Land, known as Vaidūryanirbhāsa or “Pure Lapis Lazuli.”

In Japan, he was known as Yakushi, and his popularity no doubt was bolstered by the fact that he plays an important role in The Lotus Sutra, which is arguably the most influential Sutra in Japanese Buddhist traditions. (Anyone wanna argue with me on that?) His cult in Japan is very old, dating back to the seventh century. In the late eleventh century, the author of the Sarashina Nikki (a famous literary diary/memoir) wrote of her attachment to a statue of Yakushi that had been made in her size, and her grief at being forced to leave it behind in a move.

Medicine Buddha