Heirogamia: Clarifying My Personal Position, and An Apology

Magick From Scratch

It’s not a popular thing to say in Devotional Polytheist circles, but I’m going to say it anyway: deities can’t “claim” mortals.

They can, at best, make it known to the mortal and the people around that mortal, that they are interested in having a relationship. That obligates the mortal in question to exactly nothing. It is an open door, and it is our choice whether or not to walk through that door.

They can make passionate entreaties, but they cannot actually make you walk through that door. You can’t force a person to love you. You can’t force a heart to feel loyalty and devotion.

In my article about Nonnus and Apuleius, I found myself hemming and hawing, wondering to what degree the ancient view of godspousery applied to me in my present circumstances.

I came to the following conclusion: it does not. I am not an ancient…

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On The Rocks…and Stones, and Crystals

I love crystals and stones. So does Saraswati. Lakshmi loves them more than both of us combined. I’ve amassed quite a collection, but I really have nowhere to put it all, and it keeps getting bigger. (Looking for some nice flourite next.) It’s not a cheap hobby – and yes, though I buy many of the stones for Saraswati and/or Lakshmi as offerings, it is a hobby that we share together. Devotional activity can be fun, you know. 😉

And yes, I’ll admit it. When it comes to crystals, I OWN MY DAMN FLUFF. I color code them by chakra, and believe some types of crystals are better than others for different purposes. I even have all three volumes of The Crystal Bible (though I confess, it’s mostly for entertainment purposes). I love citrine because it makes me happy. Selenite raises my consciousness to the next level. Quartz is my go-to.

DAMMIT, I AM A CRYSTAL GODDESS.

What the Hells am I Doing Again?

I take a seat in front of my shrine, crossing my legs in half-lotus one on top of the other. Shakyamuni isn’t at the center of it all, so is this still Buddhism? I hold the crystal mala to my brow and recite “AIM, AIM, AIM…” over and over, one hundred and eight times, sliding the cool spheres along the white cord (oh, how it has stretched!) until I come back to the beginning. Then I blow gently with Intent, and somehow Her energy fills me as I still my mind and fall back into myself.

I am surrounded and suffused with a white radiance, except the eye that sees it is somehow lodged between my brows. This is My Lady Saraswati’s nourishing and guarding energy. You wouldn’t think it’s much protection given how…shiny…it is, but it works very, very well indeed.

I still my mind and fall back into myself (I said that already, didn’t I?). I’m not trying to stop my thoughts, only be aware of them. Most of them sound like this: I’m hungry. What time is it? Eurgh….is that my SHOULDER making that noise when I move? I’m CREAKING!!!! I listen, then let them go. Pretty soon, my brain gives up and shuts up.

Done, Saraswati seems to say. I press the crystal beads to my brow again and place them on the altar. Is this Buddhism? I don’t know. All I know is that it’s working.

What Ancient Sources Say About Godspousery

Magick From Scratch

I got what I needed out of the Dionysiaca, in terms of the narrative of Semele’s apotheosis. However, as I was studying that text, I found myself resisting the urge to expound on the important themes in this text surrounding the idea of marriage between humans and deities.

I think it’s important to understand the author, a little, and to get some context. Nonnus is a relative late-comer, as a contributor to the Greek Mythos. He begins writing his Dionysiaca shortly after the death of the last Pagan Emperor of Rome, and was extremely learned in both Traditional Hellenic and Christian theology. His other great work which survives is his “Metabole kata Ioannou” or paraphrase of the Book of John (One of the Four Gospels).

Living in the era he lived in, knowing what he knew, he could not but be aware of the contrast between the two faiths…

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